Singing Bowl Meditation This Sunday Morning At Jacques Marchais Museum Of Tibetan Art

Sunday, May 1st at 11:00 AM at The Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art on Lighthouse Hill.

Sound Healing Meditation — or Himalayan Singing Bowl Meditation — is a focused awareness meditation. Leslee Penny is a long-time practitioner and certified instructor. 

Tibetan Singing Bowl Meditation. Image Credit - Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art

Tibetan Singing Bowl Meditation. Image Credit – Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art

In this meditation practice Tibetan singing bowls, gongs and bells guide the listener through the practice which incorporates tactile physical vibrations and frequencies in the healing process.

Leslee often recommends that practitioners lie down during the class…so bring a mat if you have one. But attendees are welcome to remain seated – the posture is a matter of personal preference.

Tibetan Singing Bowl Meditation. Image Credit - Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art

Tibetan Singing Bowl Meditation. Image Credit – Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art

Cost:  $15.00 ($12.00 JMMTA Members)  Payment at the door is fine…but please rsvp to [email protected] if you are interested in joining us this Sunday.  

We have limited space — we were close to full capacity at our last Sound Healing Meditation event.  It might be difficult for us to admit folks at the last minute. 

Banner Image: Singing Bowls Mediation.  Image Credit – Tibetan Museum

Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art

The Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art’s mission is to present the art, culture and history of Tibet to a world audience in order to educate about and inspire appreciation of Himalayan cultures and to foster better global understanding. The founder, Jacques Marchais (1887-1948) intended the Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art, established in 1945, to serve as a bridge between Tibetan art and culture and the world. The Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art preserves its unique collection of rare and sacred artifacts and provides careful stewardship of its historic buildings and gardens. In addition to presenting Jacques Marchais’ history, it is the intention of the museum to give visitors an understanding of Tibet and the Himalayan region. This “Jewel on a Hillside” replicates the monasteries of Tibet while it contains the unique artifacts that reflect the art, history, culture, and religious articles that have been destroyed in their homeland. This singular place in the USA preserves site and artifacts in memory of the founder and as a collection held in a contextual setting.

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